Outbreaks of epidemics like monkeypox will become more frequent in the world for one reason Shutterstock

Outbreaks of epidemics like monkeypox will become more frequent in the world for one reason

Olena Yatseno

Most often, diseases characteristic of the fauna are transmitted to mankind

Outbreaks of viral diseases such as monkeypox or Lassa fever will continue to occur more frequently due to climate change.

Such a statement on Wednesday, June 1, was made by the director of the World Health Organization (WHO) emergency program Michael Ryan, reports Reuters.

According to him, outbreaks of epidemics occur because climate change leads to weather anomalies.

“Because climate change contributes to the rapid change in weather patterns, which leads, for example, to drought, animals and people in search of food change their behavior. As a result, diseases characteristic of animals are transmitted to humans,” the WHO representative said.

Ryan noted that if climate change is not stopped, the cells of new diseases will become more and more, and their spread in the world could become catastrophic.

Before EcoPolitics wrote that research at Georgetown University, USA, showed that climate change increases the risk of infectious diseases caused by viruses that spread from animals to humans.

Africa and Asia are at greatest risk, as they are already hotspots for deadly infections.

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