Dengue fever is spreading rapidly across Europe due to climate change shutterstock

Dengue fever is spreading rapidly across Europe due to climate change

Anna Velyka

The West Nile virus also demonstrates the dynamics of reaching new European territories

The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) found that 130 cases of dengue fever were reported in the EU and the EEA (European Economic Area) last year alone, almost double the number of cases in the previous 10 years, when 71 cases were reported. The reason for this was the invasive mosquitoes that transmit dengue, which are spreading to previously unaffected areas in Europe.

This was reported by Politico.

The sharp increase in mosquito populations is caused by climate change, which has created environmental conditions favorable for their life and reproduction.

Symptoms of dengue fever include fever, headache, body aches, nausea, and rash.

Also in 2023, 713 cases of human infection with West Nile virus and 67 deaths were registered in 9 EU countries, including many regions where infection with this disease had never been observed before. Although this is less than the previous year (1,133 cases), the ECDC is concerned about the wide geographical spread of the virus. A local case of West Nile virus was detected in Seville, Spain, as early as March of this year.

"Europe is already seeing how climate change is creating more favorable conditions for the spread of invasive mosquitoes in previously unaffected areas and infecting more people with diseases such as dengue," said Andrea Ammon, ECDC Director.

Previously, EcoPolitic said that global warming will cause the appearance of new viruses.

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