Climate disasters killed 12,000 people in 2023

Climate disasters killed 12,000 people in 2023

Katerina Belousova

278% more people died from forest fires than in 2022, and 340% more from storms

A study by the international non-governmental organization Save the Children found that in 2023, at least 12,000 people died worldwide due to floods, forest fires, cyclones, storms, and landslides.

This is 30% more than in 2022, ReliefWeb reports.

It is noted that during about 240 climate disasters, the number of deaths increased by:

  • 60% – from landslides;
  • 278% – from forest fires;
  • 340% – from storms, which was largely affected by the tragedy in Libya, caused by Storm Daniel in September.

The article emphasized that extreme weather events are becoming more frequent and severe as a result of the climate crisis.

The study showed that 45% of the dead people were residents of countries that create only 0.1% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

"The analysis clearly shows how the climate crisis is disproportionately affecting those who have done the least to cause it and are least able to resist its most damaging consequences, further entrenching inequality, poverty and displacement. The thousands of deaths from extreme weather events this year are a particularly stark example of the enormous the impact of climate change on children, families and communities," said Save the Children's Head of Climate Change, Kelly Toole.

Earlier, EcoPolitic wrote, that a study by carbon accounting experts showed that the war in Ukraine deepens the climate crisis, and the amount of CO2 emissions in the first 12 months of the war reached about 120 million tons.

As EcoPolitic previously reported, scientists have warned that the rise in ocean temperature caused by the climate crisis is significantly increasing the number of cyclones and the intensity of storms.

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