EarthCARE satellite launched into space to study the effect of clouds on climate earth.esa.int

EarthCARE satellite launched into space to study the effect of clouds on climate

Anna Velyka

It will also measure radiation emitted from the Earth's surface and atmosphere

On May 29, the European-Japanese EarthCARE satellite went into Earth orbit. It will help scientists to study clouds and their impact on climate change.

This was announced by SpaceX, whose Falcon 9 rocket delivered the device into space.

The 2.3-tonne satellite was developed by the European Space Agency in collaboration with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency JAXA. It uses laser and radar to study the atmosphere. The device will collect data on the formation of clouds, aerosols and radiation from the surface and atmosphere of the Earth. The project, in which the UK plays a significant role, aims to provide vital information to tackle global warming.

As you know, some low-level clouds cool the planet, while others act like blankets at high altitudes. This is one of the big uncertainties in computer models used to predict climate change from rising greenhouse gases.

Scientists predict that cloud cover will decrease in the future, which will lead to clouds reflecting less sunlight into space, more will be absorbed by the Earth's surface, and this will increase global warming.

The huge technical challenge was getting all the tools to work as intended. It took 20 years from mission approval to launch.

Previously, EcoPolitic published photo of space debris, which was taken by a Japanese satellite during a space “cleanup” mission.

Related
At the Bonn Conference, negotiations on climate finance reached a deadlock
At the Bonn Conference, negotiations on climate finance reached a deadlock

What does this mean for COP29, which will take place in November in Baku

Dengue fever is spreading rapidly across Europe due to climate change
Dengue fever is spreading rapidly across Europe due to climate change

The West Nile virus also demonstrates the dynamics of reaching new European territories

Giant viruses could help slow rapid melting of Arctic ice
Giant viruses could help slow rapid melting of Arctic ice

Scientists are currently working on confirming their hypothesis

The world is on “the road to climate hell” – UN Secretary General
The world is on “the road to climate hell” – UN Secretary General

Scientists also warn about the catastrophic consequences of global warming